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PATRONAL FESTIVAL, w.e. 25th July 2021


The Patronal Festval, leading up to the Feast Day of St. James, our patron saint, (25th July) focussed on the theme of "What we did during lockdown."  Members of the congregation were given large pieces of "bunting" to decorate, to illustrate the theme, and these were joined together and displayed in church.  Refreshments were served during the weekday aftenoons.  In the afternoon of Saturday 24th, Revd. Naomi Barraclough led ‘Pop-Up Praise’ which included lots of activities for youngsters to enjoy - treasure hunt, ice a biscuit, singing, dancing… It was well attended, and a lot of fun!  The climax of the festival was a service on St. James' Day, led by
Rev'd Dyllis Dickinson, and followed by a picnic in the church grounds.



The following "pandemic poem" was written and read by Louise Morgan.


2020, it was an odd sort of year.

Bush fires raged in Oz, Storm Ciara roared in here,

Swiftly followed by Storm Dennis, flooding homes,

He carried away cars, trees and garden gnomes!

The UK held tight, looking forward to Spring,

No-one really guessed what the season would bring.

Little did we know, what disaster lay ahead,

“There’s a virus in China,” the Newsreaders said.

Covid 19 was mentioned night after night,

It was rapidly spreading, with all of its might.

Travelling through countries, crossing borders, arriving here,

An invisible enemy, stoking up fear.

 

We were soon in a Lockdown, not allowed to go out –

‘Stay at home’ was the rule, we didn’t dare flout!

Our vocabulary changed as the nation worked from home,

Words like ‘social distancing’ and ‘pandemic’ became the norm!

People started baking, banana bread was THE choice,

People started zooming, but forgot to unmute their voice.

The roads filled up with walkers and those on bikes,

Millions of dogs dragged out daily for super long hikes!

Coffee mornings and quiz nights were all held on Zoom,

Folk lived in their PJs, from midnight till noon.

 

The Lockdown pounds, soon began to appear,

Expanding waistlines benefitted from athleisure gear!

By summer, restrictions were starting to ease,

‘Eat Out to Help Out’ was the mantra if you please.

We thought we were winning this battle ‘gainst the disease,

The truth of the matter was Miss ‘Rona continued to tease.

 

Downing Street Briefings became the programme to watch,

Fancy graphics and numbers kept moving up a notch.

By autumn it was obvious that things had gone awry,

Ministers and scientists reported daily with a tear in their eye.

A second Lockdown was announced; our hearts all sank,

The shops closed down, back to queues outside the bank.

Online Christmas shopping meant we clicked and waited in,

For the delivery van to call with gifts for kith and kin.

One week before Christmas, shops were allowed to reopen,

Could we share Christmas dinner? That’s what we were hoping!

 

 

 

The guidelines came out, they weren’t that clear,

People were discouraged from spreading Christmas cheer.

No sooner had the New Year been cautiously ushered in,

We were in Lockdown again – our heads in a spin.

 

This second spike in cases was the deadliest of all,

Numbers were rocketing, only a vaccine could make them fall.

A new language emerged: Pfizer BioNTech, and Astra Zeneca,

Celebrities and Royals promoted jabs like Gary Linekar.

New graphics were added to the Downing St briefings,

We rejoiced as we saw jab numbers swiftly increasing.

An invitation to get jabbed – the first outing in an age,

Meant we actually got dressed up as if performing on a stage.

It’s now mid summer, restrictions are lifting,

Normal life beckons, but routines take some shifting.

 

We pause to reflect on the time we’ve been through,

It’s been a tough old journey for me and you.




Pictures of the Festival are below - click on "Continue" for more.

Some of the bunting
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